All posts in Female Action Heroes

The Return to Seattle and Geek Girl Con

Geek Girl Con is back for its second year and WONDER WOMEN! will be part of the fun!

The two-day convention gives female geeks and their supporters the opportunity to build a community, share facts and fandom, and learn how they can help promote the role of women in geek culture.

Last year WONDER WOMEN! Director Kristy Guevara-Flanagan screened footage from our then work in progress and also sat on a panel to discuss the evolution and representation of female empowerment.

We’re honored to be invited back and show WONDER WOMEN! in its entirety to Geek Girl Con attendees. Executive Producer Erin Prather Stafford will be there to introduce the film.

Hello Seattle and SIFF!!!

The WONDER WOMEN! team is back together for the Seattle International Film Festival (SIFF). We’re ecstatic to be here, especially since Seattle is the home of both Jen Stuller, author of the fantastic book “Ink-Stained Amazons and Cinematic Warriors: Superwomen in Modern Mythology,” and the nonprofit Reel Grrls. Both are featured in WONDER WOMEN!

The film will be screening three times during SIFF:

Saturday, May 26, 3:30 p.m. at the Everett Performing Arts Center

Sunday, May 27, 4 p.m. at the Egyptian Theatre

Monday, May 28, 6 p.m. at the Harvard Exit

SIFF has posted information on its website about obtaining tickets.

We’re also part of an amazing panel “Titled “Sheroes in Media: Women and Girls Changing the Game” on Saturday, May 26, 7:30 p.m. at the SIFF Film Center. It is free and open to the public.

Kristy Guevara-Flanagan: Director, WONDER WOMEN!; Jen Stuller, who is also programming Director for GeekGirlCon; Daniel Tayara: Reel Grrls youth filmmaker; Megan Gaiser, Her Interactive and Marta Smith, IGNITE: Inspiring Girls Now In The Technology Evolution, will discuss how women, both real and fictional, are represented in American culture.

Who influences and controls the media messages we receive about strong women – and how are they internalized by consumers?

Can’t make the panel? No worries, we’ll be tweeting from it live over at @wonderwomandoc, hashtag #sheroesSIFF.

And check back here for more news from SIFF!

Megan Gaiser and Marta Smith Join SIFF Panel

Megan Gaiser, Her Interactive, and Marta Smith, IGNITE: Inspiring Girls Now In The Technology Evolution, will be a panelists at “Sheroes in Media: Women and Girls Changing the Game.”

They join Kristy Guevara-Flanagan: Director, WONDER WOMEN!; Jennifer K. Stuller: Author, Ink-Stained Amazons and Cinematic Warriors: Superwomen in Modern Mythology and Programming Director for GeekGirlCon; and Daniel Tayara: Reel Grrls youth filmmaker for a discussion on how women, both real and fictional, are represented in American culture. Who influences and controls the media messages we receive about strong women – and how are they internalized by consumers?

The panel takes place Saturday, May 26, 7:30 p.m. at the SIFF Film Center. It is free and open to the public.

As Chief Creative Strategy Officer and former CEO of Her Interactive, Megan Gaiser sets creative direction, brand and portfolio expansion and cultivates strategic partnerships. Under her stewardship, Her Interactive (HI) has grown from a boutique company to an emerging competitor with the globally-loved Nancy Drew franchise games sales topping 9 million units world-wide. The Nancy Drew PC franchise is the #1 in the U.S. six years running.

Marta Smith started working for Microsoft in 1991 in Quality Assurance, then became a Test Lead in 1998.  She continued in that role until she left Microsoft in 2010 and went to work at a local liaison office for Western Digital (a hard drive manufacturing company).  Over the course of her Microsoft career, she worked on DOS-based, Windows-based, and Mac-based products, and on various releases of DOS Works, WinWorks, WinWord, MacWord, Mac Messenger, Mac Communicator…and the list goes on.

WONDER WOMEN! screenings at SIFF:

Saturday, May 26, 3:30 p.m. at the Everett Performing Arts Center

Sunday, May 27, 4 p.m. at the Egyptian Theatre

Monday, May 28, 6 p.m. at the Harvard Exit

SIFF has posted information on its website about obtaining tickets.

From Wonder Woman to Buffy to Rogue. Fans Share Fave Action Heroines!

A HUGE thanks to everyone who has already participated in our Social Media/WONDER WOMEN! love fest. We appreciate everyone following us on TWITTER, tweeting about the film, liking us on Facebook and posting who is their favorite action heroine.

In fact the Facebook posts have been so great we wanted to share them with you! Enjoy!

“Wonder Woman keeps me going when I need to put on my own warrior boots.” ~Samantha

“If this doesn’t get me a T-shirt from your swag give-a-way then I don’t know what will! I have collected WW stuff since I was a kid…check out the pics of my kitchen…PICK ME! :)” ~Traci

“Aside, of course, from my mother, Wonder Woman is, so far, the heroine to beat in my book. That combo of compassion and heart, and the ability to lay you flat if you can’t listen to reason…well…sounds like the best mothers I’ve ever known!” ~Grace

“Wonder Woman, by far!” ~Mariko

“I’m a big fan of Veronica Mars, personally!” ~Quin

“I love Wonder Woman but there is a special place in my heart for the original Bat Girl, who was a public librarian just like I am.” ~Rosalia

“I favor the Huntress (Batman & Catwoman’s daughter) in comics and the shortlived TV show.” ~Ralph

“I don’t think I could choose just a single favorite action heroine, but one I adore is Hawkgirl.” ~Kim

“Comic: Batwoman (Detective Comics), Film: Katniss, TV: Either Toph or Korra.” ~Janaki

“My favorite action heroines are Xena and Storm from the X-Men. Nobody can kick butt like Xena and I love her sword fights. Storm is smart, flies and can control the weather. She’s awesome!” ~Jenee

“I want it all! And I adore Firefly’s/Serenity’s River Tam, the most unlikely action heroine of them all.” ~Rochus

“I would love and be proud to wear a Wonder Women shirt.” ~Sarah

“My favorite action heroine is Wonder Woman. How can you beat “beautiful as Aphrodite, wise as Athena, stronger than Hercules, and swifter than Mercury.” ~Julie

“I’ve always wanted to be Wonder Woman when I grew up. But I also like Rogue from X Men!” ~Rebecca

“Modesty Blaise!” ~Jennifer

“What women didn’t want to be Rogue…with her powers through skin to skin and able to retain all memories and super strength of course :)” ~Kera

“Right now, the Black Widow is at the top of my list. That clip from the Avengers is so fun to watch. I’m enjoying the new (old?) Barbara Gordon Batgirl also. Xena might be my all time favorite, though.” ~Tanya

“Wonder Woman has been my favorite since I was 3 years old.” ~Selina

“Storm was a bada*** too…and Catwoman..or how about Ms. Marvel! Siiigh, so many good choicesss” ~Kera

“I’m sorry Joss, you know I love Buffy, but Ellen Ripley would be #1 for me, followed by Buffy. Ripley, when she was still 100% human, showed how intelligence under pressure could outmaneuver evil humans and monsters without supernatural strength.” ~Tonya

“I have to go with Buffy – so real, so vulnerable, so human.” ~Cynthia

“Always Wonder Woman!” ~Dina

“Wonder Woman!! ~WW~” ~Marc

“I agree with Jen–Modesty Blaise!” ~Amy

“Kitty Pryde!” ~Daniel

“Woman. Really. Many close 2nd’s, of course. :)” ~Kimberley

“Elisa Maza (Gargoyles), because she was a badass (cartoon) woman of color who carried a serious can of whoop-ass and flew with Gargoyles.” ~Candance

“Erin Grey as Wilma Derring in Buck Rogers; my daughter with epic stories of triumph; my misogynist father who taught me how NOT TO VIEW WOMAN.” ~Sean

“I grew up inspired by Wonder Woman, Batgirl and Catwoman, but then moved on to Storm, Rogue, and The White Queen, then it was Buffy, and lately, I’ve moved back to the X-Men and have found new inspiration in Jean Grey’s Phoenix. She would often come across as weak, or indecisive or annoying, but then she break out of her mold and become the badass, powerful woman she was meant to be, and she would be amazing to behold.” ~Andrea

“Toph from Avatar: The Last Airbender. Teaching people not to pick on the little blind girl since 2006.” ~Abigail

Haven’t entered yet? Here’s how you can put your name in the hat for some awesome prizes:

Follow @wonderwomandoc on TWITTER and retweet the following message:

“I support WONDER WOMEN! Follow @wonderwomandoc and find out how action heroines have evolved and changed our lives. www.wonderwomendoc.com”

Or

Like us on FACEBOOK and comment on one of our posts about the giveaway on who is your favorite action heroine.

If you want an extra entry you can do both to have your name put in the raffle twice.

The swag will be given away to lucky winners who have entered by Friday, May 25! Names will be drawn the following week and items shipped to winners’ addresses.

Good luck!

Social Media + Love = Swag

As mentioned in a previous post, WONDER WOMEN! is giving away some awesome swag from our world premiere at the 2012 SXSW Film Festival.

But it gets better! Our Executive Producer Erin has donated a new, still wrapped Wonder Woman Sensation Comics Cover Nov. No. 11 metal sign, which she found during Free Comic Book Day.

It measures 7.5  x 11 inches and is already equipped with a saw-tooth hanger on back.

What an awesome addition to a Wonder Woman lover’s cube, office or room!

In addition to the sign there are also opportunities to receive a WONDER WOMEN! World Premier Poster (size small) or a WONDER WOMEN shirt (size large).

How do you enter the raffle? By giving WONDER WOMEN! some social media love.

Follow @wonderwomandoc on TWITTER and retweet the following message:

“I support WONDER WOMEN! Follow @wonderwomandoc and find out how action heroines have evolved and changed our lives. www.wonderwomendoc.com”

or

Like us on FACEBOOK and comment on one of our posts about the giveaway on who is your favorite action heroine.

If you want an extra entry you can do both to have your name put in the raffle twice.

The swag will be given away to lucky winners who have entered by Friday, May 25! Names will be drawn the following week and items  shipped to winners’ addresses.

Good luck!

SIFF Panel: Sheroes in Media: Women and Girls Changing the Game

WONDER WOMEN! will be part of a free panel during the Seattle International Film Festival (SIFF) titled “Sheroes in Media: Women and Girls Changing the Game.” It will take place Saturday, May 26, 7:30 p.m. at the SIFF Film Center.

Sheroes exist. They can be found in the stories of comics, novels, film, television, and video games. They can also be found in real life – in mothers and sisters, community leaders, and media makers.

Join Kristy Guevara-Flanagan: Director, WONDER WOMEN!; Jennifer K. Stuller: Author, Ink-Stained Amazons and Cinematic Warriors: Superwomen in Modern Mythology and Programming Director for GeekGirlCon; Daniel Tayara: Reel Grrls youth filmmaker; and others as they discuss how women, both real and fictional, are represented in American culture. Who influences and controls the media messages we receive about strong women – and how are they internalized by consumers?

The event is open to the public

WONDER WOMEN! screenings at SIFF:

Saturday, May 26, 3:30 p.m. at the Everett Performing Arts Center

Sunday, May 27, 4 p.m. at the Egyptian Theatre

Monday, May 28, 6 p.m. at the Harvard Exit

SIFF has posted information on its website about obtaining tickets.

Filmmakers Recall Fictional Childhood Heroines

Director Kristy Guevara-Flanagan

Star Wars was HUGE when I was growing up. I loved everything about it. One Halloween I dressed up as Princess Leia. I was probably seven or eight and had these little fake buns on either side of my head. Instead of Trick or Treat my dad made me say “May the force be with you.”

Princess Leia is not a superheroine per se, but during my childhood girls’ options were limited! My neighbor was always Wonder Woman, so unfortunately that was out.

Over the years I’ve come to see Leia as similar in character to Lois Lane. Both are full of grit and gumption, yet bound by their love interests and not the foreground hero.

This doesn’t take away from Leia being essential in the Star Wars universe. Her inclusion as a main character allowed me to role play with the boys when they acted out their light saber duels or infiltrated the Death Star. I’m glad there are now more costume options for girls.

 

Producer Kelcey Edwards

My heroine to act out was not inspired by traditional media, but imagination and two of my favorite books at the time – Bridge to Terabithia and The Witch of Blackbird Pond. Her name was Kittarina.

She was both a “good witch” and “high priestess” who reigned over The Land Of The Green Waters (which in reality was a creek that ran through the Texas Hill Country property my family lived on when I was nine). My crown was a thin circle of budding weeds woven together. I carried a staff made out of a treasured branch, stripped of its leaves and taller than I was.

The symbol of my kingdom was a hook with a line drawn through it, representing the rights of the fish that my fellow ruler (my friend Kate who assumed the named Queen Katanya) had sworn to protect. We would wander through the forested creek banks, mingling with our subjects, climbing trees and looking for adventure. After a good rain, we would find an occasional arrowhead.

Once, the boys from the ranch next door (scrawny things with rat tails and bad attitudes) began shooting at us with their BB guns from across the creek.

“Witches!” they called us, chanting like hyenas.

Queen Katanya, unusually tall for her age, stood even taller, narrowed her eyes and pointed her staff at them.

“That’s right,” she said. “We ARE witches….”

We stared at them with all of our might, and they ran shrieking up the hill.

The turf was ours. And it was grand.

 

Executive Producer Erin Prather Stafford

The two heroines I embraced were Rainbow Brite and She-Ra. When I was seven my mother and grandmother slaved over making a Rainbow costume for Halloween. It was fantastic and I’m still saddened we lost it in a fire.

The first time I saw Rainbow was in the movie “The Beginning of Rainbowland.” Something about bringing brightness to a coloress world struck a chord. I had it on a Betamax tape and played it till the reels blew out.

You had the evil hooded King of Shadows who turned sprites to stone…totally freaked me out. I loved that Rainbow beat him. And she was always brave. Even when scared she pressed on to do the right thing.

Then there was She-Ra, I was her for Halloween in third grade. Mom had these knee high tan boots that were the perfect shade so I stuffed them with socks to make them fit my feet.

A childhood friend had all of the He-Man toys (which I loved) and we watched Masters of the Universe together. Then along came She-Ra and “The Secret of the Sword.” Suddenly I had more female players to bring over (besides Teela) along with new villains for us to defeat.

And She-Ra’s sword was known as the “Sword of Protection.” How kickass is that? I admit that when Masters of the Universe was rebooted in 2002, it bummed me out She-Ra didn’t also make a comeback.

“For the Honor of Grayskull.”

Producer Kelcey Edwards Speaks With Rise Up Radio

WONDER WOMEN! Producer Kelcey Edwards spoke with the awesome folks at Rise Up Radio, which airs on WBAI, New York – 99.5 FM. Rise Up Radio (formerly Student Voices For Peace) is a collective radio show by and for youth activists. The interview starts at 17 minutes in.









WONDER WOMEN! also recently received attention from MTV, GeekMom.com, Film Threat and Ms. Magazine.

97° West Catch Up With Kristy and Kelcey for Quick Video Q&A

Austin company 97° West had a film crew at this year’s SXSW. They caught up with Kristy and Kelcey at the Austin Convention Center and asked what drove them to make WONDER WOMEN. Watch their answers below!

You can view other 97° West segments from the festival on their blog.

Wonder Woman Pilot Rejected by NBC

As you may or may not know the new Wonder Woman pilot episode was not picked up by NBC, reason being, the outfit did not match the original Wonder Woman.

The argument that was made was that “She is meant to be an inspiring feminist icon, but she represents a vast array of things that feminism despises. By which I mean, she dresses like a stripper.” However, an article from “DC Women Kicking Ass” entitled, “It’s not the costume, stupid” argues that the costume argument is just an excuse for the real reason they are rejecting it.

When asked why there was no Wonder Woman movie Darren Franich from Entertainment Weekly said, “It’s just much easier to sell a male action film to studios than a female one.”

When the only audience they think of is men, that may be true, but “Women want to see characters that are strong and smart and capable. They don’t want to see characters that are cliches or bastardizations or characters that are seen through the lens of male writers and creators who don’t write authentic women but as archetypes and a mindfield of sexist tropes.”

They say it is hard to sell a female hero, but when is the last time they tried?

Click here to view article!

– Jackie Grieff

Aspiring Director/Editor working on a Bachelors degree in Digital Film and Video Production at The Art Institute of California – San Francisco. Interning with Kristy Guevara-Flanagan for the project THE HISTORY OF THE UNIVERSE AS TOLD BY WONDER WOMAN. Self-proclaimed nerd, and long time super hero lover.

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